Cowry shells, native to the Maldive Islands and used as currency across West Africa, were often used to create decorative patterns on ceramic vessels.The Ouidah Museum of HistoryCowry shells, native to the Maldive Islands and used as currency across West Africa, were often used to create decorative patterns on ceramic vessels.Cowry shells, native to the Maldive Islands and used as currency across West Africa, were often used to create decorative patterns on ceramic vessels.Cowry shells, native to the Maldive Islands and used as currency across West Africa, were often used to create decorative patterns on ceramic vessels.
HOMESite Francais Contact Us

A "sacred" python:  the kingdom of Dahomey adopted worship of the python from the Xwéda kingdom, and python veneration is continued in Ouidah to this day.
About the Museum
Themes
History of Ouidah
Visiting Ouidah
Resources
Visiting the Museum

Contact Information

BP 33 Ouidah
Républic du Bénin
(229) 21-34-10-21

Hours of Operation

Monday through Friday: 8H to 12H, 15H to 18H.
Saturday and Sunday: 9H and 18H.
State Holidays: 9H and 18H.

Cost of Admission

Foreigners: 1.000 FCFA
Beninese: 500 FCFA

Getting to the Museum

Driving from Cotonou , take the paved road to Togo , and veer left at the grand Ouidah monument (with snakes encircling the columns). Once in the city, the museum will be on the left in a large white walled structure (the old Portuguese Fort).

Driving from Lome toward Cotonou , turn right at the grand Ouidah monument (with snakes in encircling the columns). Once in the city, the museum will be on the left in a large white walled structure (the old Portuguese fort).

Group Visits

To arrange a visit of a large group please call the museum at the main number in advance.

Shield adorning the entrance to the old Portuguese Fort, now the Ouidah Museum of History.
Typical decorative pattern on Xwédan ceramic artifacts.Typical decorative pattern on Xwédan ceramic artifacts.